Bereavement

Bereavement is when someone that we care about dies and describes some of the ways we might act and feel at the time and in the longer term.  It can be anyone who is important to you such your parents, grandparents, brothers or sisters, friends, boyfriend or girlfriend or even a family pet.

 

We can have similar feelings when the person hasn’t died but has moved away or we no longer see them, such as when parents split up or when we have to move or change schools.  This is called loss. Bereavement or loss can affect different people in different ways and there is no right way to feel.

 

Common feelings after bereavement or loss include:  

  • feeling shock, sadness, helplessness, anger, guilt
  • feeling numb, which means you feel like you have no feelings at all
  • jumping quickly from one feeling to another without warning or control.

 

There are so many different feelings that can all come at the same time you may feel like you are unable to cope.

 

Hopefully, with time, you’ll start to notice an improvement in how you’re feeling but if instead your feelings become more difficult and they’re affecting your daily life then it is important that you ask for help.

 

If you want to know more about bereavement or loss and the help you can get you might find these websites useful:

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